The Tony Castles are a Brooklyn-based rock group.

I dug the show last night.
Willie: Yeah. There was a little bit of comic relief. Oh well.
Gabriel: I’m kind of glad we got it out of our system, a little bit.
Willie: I think we got a few more in us.

Well, that’s live performance for you.
Willie: I never felt drafty in there. That’s my least favorite time when you’re playing shows. When it feels drafty when you play. You know? No one here is having fun.

What do you attribute your sound to?
Willie: We write together. Somebody will have an idea for something and we’ll usually jam on it. We like a lot of the same music. I’ve never been in a band with a singer before. So it’s different for me. I always played more like, pulse-oriented music. So it’s been good for me to play with people that played in indie bands. And I hated that shit in high school, you know what I mean? It just wasn’t interesting for me. I liked hippie bands and jazz. I liked new stuff that appealed to the notion that everything could be different.
Paul: I don’t really think we have a plan to make a song sound a certain way. We just let it develop.

Do you trust that process?
Willie: We don’t know yet.
Paul: We’ve only been together a year.
Gabriel: it’s fun. sometimes we’ll just be chatting and dicking around and we’re like, “Wait, that sounds cool!”
Willie: That happens all the time.
Gabriel: Stream of consciousness songwriting.

You’re getting a lot more attention now. How do you take to that?
Gabriel: We’ve only been playing together for a year so it’s hard to say we’ve found our sound. But we have these songs and we’re really proud of them. So we’re excited to be able to share them with people.

Willie: My mom likes this band more than she’s liked any other band I’ve been in.
Gabriel: Mine too!
Willie: I’m trying to get my folks to come to a show.
Paul: My parents are coming to a show.
Willie: I have a friend from Bosnia who was in America and saw us play maybe our fourth show. He wrote some things about watching us play. He wanted us to be called the “Principle of Princes.” He had some ideas about that. It’s all pretty good. He’s a weird guy. He was all talking about “a pastoral fetish…I suggest you take anything you need from literature, as much as possible as much as you need.” He also said we should be called “The Happy Birthday of Tony.” Also, “I think I was mostly fascinated by the drummer because he was naïve therefore ecstatic.”
Gabriel: The first time I read it, I was like, fuck you, man! (laughs)

How do you anticipate using the studio?
Gabriel: We are really excited to be working with Jake (Aaron). We’ve all talked with him individually and collectively about what we’re looking for, what kind of sound we’d like on the record, production-wise.
Willie: Every time we go into the studio, he’s like “this is going to be the one.” It’s that attitude. I feel that way, but I feel realistic about it too. It’s like a match. It’s like a hockey match, or something, facing an opponent, in a way. I’m really looking forward to it. We all have our specific ideas, we all have our group ideas, and I think it’s just a matter of putting the man hours. That’s what it’s going to take, the fucking man hours. And that’s what so hard about the studio; it’s so damn expensive.

How do you stay clear of trends?
Paul: Honestly, there’s no predetermined sound. We’re not trying to make a song sound a certain way, like I mentioned. If we have a song that sounds trendy and we like it…we’re not trying to sound trendy.
Willie: It’s like we listen to new music and we listen to old music. We have these sounds in our head and it’s up to you to get them out, it’s up to you to make them happen.
Gabriel: We try to be as trendy as possible.
Willie: That’s why it’s nice to be the warmth of these big pop acts, if they’re legit. It’s nice to admire, there’s a certain gathering aspect that’s good. Everyone’s going to it, why wouldn’t you?
Paul: Honestly, there’s no predetermined sound. We’re not trying to make a song sound a certain way, like I mentioned. If we have a song that sounds trendy and we like it…we're not going to throw something out unless its no fun.
Willie: It’s like we listen to new music and we listen to old music. We have these sounds in our head and it’s up to you to get them out, it’s up to you to make them happen.
Gabriel: It’s easy to jump on a bandwagon, you know? It’s easy to follow suit. It’s something about humanity. I used to work in an ice cream truck and it’d be a perfectly sunny day and no one was coming up. Then, one courageous person came to the truck, then one other person sees that person buying ice cream. They decide they’ll have one too. All the sudden, there’s 50 people in line and I’m scooping away!

Visit The Tony Castles' website.

Back.

Bookmark and Share

 

 Features

 Archive

 About

 Contact

 Contributors

 Subscribe

 —

© 2009

Tony Castles Interview

Corban Goble